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Webinar Expert Adam Urbanski, the Millionaire Marketing Mentor

In this episode The Millionaire Marketing Mentor, Adam Urbanski covers how to improve your webinars and how to teach and sale on your webinars.

Adam Urbanski is the go-to guy for successful service professionals who want to quickly attract more clients, increase their sales, and make more profits. His students and clients often multiple their revenues and profits by two, five, and even 10 times in 90 days or less! Known worldwide as The Millionaire Marketing Mentor® Adam built and sold his first 7-figure business in less than 10 years starting with only $194 and a limited ability to speak English. Through his current company, http://TheMarketingMentors.com, every week Adam influences over 80,000 coaches, consultants, speakers, experts, online marketers and entrepreneurs, teaching them how to transform their limiting, time-intensive businesses into automated money making machines that Attract Clients Like Crazy®. To download Adam’s proven Million Dollar Coaching Business Blueprint go to http://themarketingmentors.com.

Click here to watch the entire interview on video

To get Adam’s special report on the Webinar Cash Machine go to webinarcashmachine.com/blueprint

Read Full Transcript

Melodie:
It's all right. What is one thing listeners could do today that would make a big difference in their webinars if it was only one thing that they could take from today's interview?

Adam:
One thing. They should have capped that participant count. That would have been big. One thing, I would say, once you get to the actual webinar, learn how to teach and sell. I mentioned it earlier. Just teaching is not the same as selling. Most people have the tendency to get better at their topic, whatever it is that they do. What you want to get better at is marketing and selling, and especially the psychology of buying. Most people get on the teleseminar or webinar ... I keep saying teleseminar because, again, it's, even today, it's not a bad way to get started if you're brand new. Don't say I have to do a webinar. You may do a teleseminar. It's simple and people still love teleseminars. I still use them.

Learn that ... I just lost my train of thought. It was about teaching and selling, right? Whatever you do, teleseminar or webinar, some people get started and they go, "Nobody bought. I thought I delivered my best stuff and nobody bought." They didn't buy is because you worked some other people and you spent half an hour telling your story, giving people 20 minutes of maybe good content, and then another 20 minutes pitching. However, your story and your content were probably not even related to what you were pitching, not close enough. You failed to deliver a content that really got people excited about wanting to get more stuff.

I would often call it teach and sell or teach to sell or stretch teaching. I want to give you a formula here. The way you want to teach is you want to tell people what they need to do to solve whatever problem they ... You may actually do this. Tell people what problem they're experiencing, because you're showcasing that you understand the problem. Tell people what they need to do to fix that problem, but in a conceptual, fairly broad level, because if you get too nitty gritty, you may overwhelm them. That does not mean don't give good content. It doesn't mean do not give technical details. Just be careful with it. You teach them what they need to do. The third step you do is you teach them why they need to do it. Then the fourth part is you either share an example, a case study, or a statistic. You repeat this cycle three times. You have three teaching points. Now your offer should be an improvement to what you just started.

Let's say I taught you one of my lessons. I'd say, "Look, what you have to learn is how to teach and sell. Here's why it's important and here's what happens if you don't know how to do this." Then in my actual offer, I would say, "As part of our training, what you get is an actual template how to structure presentation that teaches and sells, step by step, word by word, bullet by bullet, will teach you how to do it the right way." In other words, the key message here that I want folks to get is you want to tell your audience what to do, and even a little bit about how to do. Then your offer needs to help them do it better and faster. If you do it that way, you will always get better results from whatever presentation you're doing to sell.

Melodie:
I think that's really great advice. I'll just add on because I think sometimes people get overwhelmed. At least start. If right now where you are is teaching, teach, but understand you don't have the pitching part yet. Teach, get your word out, and just keep making baby steps or giant steps, depending on where you are. Every time you do something, add something to it. I think exactly what you laid out there, start off with that. Start of with that format as close as you can be, and improve it every time. You'll start seeing what works and what doesn't work, either by monitoring the counts like you're talking about, by just making little twists or turns.

For me, I like watching other webinars. I'll watch other webinars and see what people are doing. Sometimes I look at it and say, "Okay, I can't do that." It's not my style. It's not that it's bad. It's just not what I'd feel comfortable with. Sometimes I can see somebody and I'm like, "Oh, I see what they're doing. Let me see if I can implement that, that phrase of that kind of thing."

Adam:
That's a great approach. You want to watch other people. The lesson I always show of my students is you want to learn of content and context. Just to explain what it means, content, if you watch ... Let's say you take a webinar on marketing or even someone who teaches webinars how to do webinars. There are two paths you want to follow. Content is what they teach you. They go you do this, do this, do this. That's fantastic. What you want to observe is the context, which is what they say, when they say it, and how they say it. You have the whole picture.

Why would you do it? Because if someone actually is teaching what they really do and they're good at it, then you have the opportunity to watch a master craftsman building a masterpiece. The content is the masterpiece. If you want to yourself create a masterpiece, you want to observe how the master crafted it. If you know how to decipher lessons from that contextual observation, that's priceless.

When I go to live events today, I do the same thing. There is not so much new content, but watching how the event is structured, watching how the speaker handles the audience, there is magic there.

Melodie:
For sure. I've been very blessed in my life to get to see many, many life presenters, some of the top, not some, the top in the world. It's funny to me now because I do a lot of technical presentations. That's what I do for my job. I'm not going to be on the stage doing really motivational. That's not what I do normally, but I've learned from them what keeps the audience engaged. I don't care what your topic is, you can learn that skillset to keep them engaged. I deal with some very geeky technical people. Yet I can make them laugh. I can keep them engaged and involved. It's just because I've picked up these tips, like you said, in watching other people. How are they able to keep them involved? Tell a story. Tell a joke. Jokes are funny, but you can make fun or yourself and they'll laugh because they've been there. You connect, that kind of thing. I agree with it. You really watch the content and the context. That's very key as well.

Adam:
You mentioned a very important thing earlier and I don't want to skimp over it. That is don't beat yourself up when you're starting because what you often see when you register for other people's webinars is years of work and practicing, whether it was on a webinar, so on real stage presentations, and even the big names sometimes fall completely flat on their faces and we get zero results or not what we anticipate upfront. We still fail. We don't live up to the expectations we set out for ourselves.

Then the hardest thing, especially when you're getting started, is when you put so much work into this, you stress, you sweat, you put the presentation together, you promote it and maybe not as many people showed up as you wanted to or maybe something didn't quite work out in your presentation. The result, it wasn't what you anticipated. It's so easy to get discouraged. Don't. Give yourself a pat on the back for what you did put together, what you did accomplish, then do what I call life's greatest teacher experience exercise. Life's greatest teacher is actually your own experience. Most people don't use it.

What happens, look, we set out expectations. This is a little outside of the webinar but, folks, this is so helpful if you grasp this. We set out expectations for ourselves. Here's how we perform as human beings. Here's the expectation. If we hit it or exceed it, we go like, "Wow, high five, man. Life is awesome. Let me just go do it again. Let me tell everybody how great I am." If we set expectation and we don't hit it, we get disappointed. We get like, "Oh, I'm stuck. I'm horrible. I'm a horrible human being. Nobody loves me."

Melodie:
[crosstalk 00:09:17] I know.

Adam:
I could just go jump off the bridge.

Melodie:
Exactly.

Adam:
If you look at it, what worked? What didn't work? What could I have done differently? Now, let me do this again and don't do what didn't work and do more of what worked. You end up with better results next time.

Melodie:
Exactly. I agree with you. Some of the things I've realized in life is even ... Well, one thing I learned, I realized in presenting, it was somewhere along the way when I was first doing public presentations and I was so ... Literally my hands would be shaking. I realized at some point that the people in the audience had no idea what I was going to say. If I don't say it quite right, the way I wanted to say it, they don't know the difference. Once I got that in my head, it released some of the stress and the nerves and all that kind of stuff.

Then the other thing I realized is that if you step out and do the things outside of your comfort zone, you get out and you do your first webinar, even if you don't think it's very good you've still done something that 95% of the people in this population have never done. Be in that group. You're still so much further ahead than people who haven't even tried. You may find maybe webinars aren't for you. I've interviewed different people. They like labs or they like teleseminars. Try different things. Don't get stuck in one. You started with teleseminars but you didn't stay there. You may still use them sometimes for some stuff because in the right context they're a great vehicle. Just keep trying different things and you'll find your niche. You'll find your path that you need to be on.

Adam:
When I first started this business, the coaching and consulting, like so many people I networked to get clients. I was horrible at it.

Melodie:
I'm still not great at it. I'm just going to say. That's just not me ...

Adam:
Actually my entire business came out of the fact that I didn't like networking that much. The lesson here I want to share is this. One of the pivotal points for me happened when I said, "You know what?" I realized there is a paradox in networking, that everybody goes there to get clients. Therefore everybody there is selling. Who the hell is buying?

Melodie:
Exactly. I've had that same thought.

Adam:
Let me actually go to networking events and do things different. Let me look for two things, actually three things, for people that I can help. Number two, for people that I would love to get together and just hang out, just make friends, go to dinner and have a drink, and three, have people who can introduce me, meet people who can introduce me to lots of people that would love to learn from what I do. I basically showed up to help people. That made all the difference.

I'm mentioning this because what are you doing, a teleseminar or webinar? When you're nervous and you're afraid of what would it be like and will you deliver on people's expectations, realize this. Your audience wants you to succeed. Why? Because if you succeed they win. The better you do, the better off they are from your presentation. This myth of hostile audience, let me tell you, in 15 years of public presentations, I had one audience that was an energy drainer and I was like, "Who the hell are those people?" They didn't care about anything I had to say.

Melodie:
Why are they here. Most people in the audience are there. They want you to succeed. They're there because they want to hear what you have to say. They wouldn't have lent their time to you to be there, because they've committed an hour, two hours, whatever it is, to come hear you. They're there to hear what you have to say.

Hopefully we've proved to people today you just keep going. You keep going, you do the best you can do with technology, because it's technology. That's what it is.

Adam:
Two things to finish the lesson. Show up at a webinar with he intention to help people. Don't get all of this ... Let me tell you. When I first started public presentations, I did better. Then my results started dipping. Why? Because at first I didn't know jack about how to speak and sell, but I just came with my heart. I was like, "I'm here to help you." At the end I would say, "If this help you, here's how you can continue that helpfulness, getting the helpfulness from me." That was my earnest approach. Then I started learning all the little manipulation techniques, and my results sucked. You go out, you help people.

Second thing. You know what? In 2000 you would pay $1,000 just flat fee and something like, I forgot what it was, like $9 per minute per person to deliver a webinar, in 2000, crazy money to a person like you an me, totally inaccessible. This was a junky, clunky presentation where you could just display slides, no interaction, zero. Today you can actually see us on this screen and it costs zero, zero, to do this.

You can start doing this today. Start doing your own blog an periscope and just start teaching. Remember, when you pitch, people run, but when you teach, people start coming to you.

Melodie:
I will say, and this is something I've struggled a little bit with Blab, but I try on every Blab to do a call to action. That is how to connect, how to connect with me. I put your link on there a couple of times for the report that you're offering free, and I'll put it on there again in a minute. Be sure and put that kind of stuff because you do want to connect with your audience. You want to build a list, like we were talking about earlier. You want to build, attract people to your teaching, your webinars, your teleseminars, whatever you're doing. On Blab I think people forget to do that as much as they don't like selling. Your calls to action are good. Free reports are good. People want to get to know you.

What I found out on Blab is people would ask. How can I connect with you. I'm like, "Oh, yeah, I probably should tell you that." That's true on the webinars. If you don't feel comfortable selling, just offer them something to start with. Get on and teach them a little bit. Offer them a free report. Offer them to connect with you on your Facebook group. There's all kinds of ways to provide value to people.

Adam:
If you're not sure what to do, just tell people this. "Look, I don't want to sell you anything, but if you could email me your credit card number, you never know if I want to buy something. I could use your credit card number."

Melodie:
Exactly. I'm good with that. First of all, I want to thank you Adam. This has been great. I've learned a lot. This has been a fun conversation. I've enjoyed interacting with you. Thank you. Thank you so much for being on here with me.

Adam:
Likewise. Thanks for the invite. I appreciate being here. For those that have stuck with us for more than 60 seconds, they got a little bit out of it. The thing is, one last step for everybody. Whatever stuck for you out of this conversation, go and put it into action. Just do one thing, but do it to the point where it actually gets you a result, so it starts producing whatever it's desired to do. Don't just do it three quarters of the way and say, "Oh, it's getting hard." That last quarter will be the hardest but do it so you can actually get the result out of it. Then the next idea, and again, implement it completely. That's how successful people become unstoppable, getting an idea, implementing it completely, moving on to the next one. Whatever stuck for you out of this conversation, just do it.

Melodie:
Amen. Thank you very much. I really, really appreciate your time today and all your great advice. I look forward to crossing paths again with you some day.

Adam:
Absolutely.

Melodie:
Thank you very much for being on the show.

Adam:
Thank you. Take care. Cheers everybody.

Melodie:
You're welcome. Bye bye.